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Every Native American Woman has a Story to Tell

Posted on by Veronica Tiller

If only one woman from each of the 562 tribes began writing her story or stories, there would be 562 stories ready for publication in the very near future. You might say, what can I write about that will interest other people? And I say, you can start by writing about your own personal story. Everyone has a story to tell and they are all important. So much has happened to Indian people just since the 1950s from the relocation of Indian people from rural Indian reservations to major urban areas and the termination of Indian Tribes of the 1950s, the Indian rights movement and beginning of Self-Determination for Indian Tribes of the 1960s and 1970s, the first round of tribal economic development efforts of the 1970s, and the advent of Indian Gaming of the late 1980s and 1990s. 

Where were you and what were you doing during these times? What role did you play? What impact did any of these movements have on you and your family? Do you know any woman that made a contribution to her tribe during these times? 

 What were your successes and accomplishments? If you can answer any of these questions within the context of the times, you have a story. There is no shortage of topics. Each and every story is important to our tribal histories and our identity as Indian people and they all deserve to be preserved and recorded and published.

Where were you and what were you doing during these times? What role did you play? What impact did any of these movements have on you and your family? Do you know any woman that made a contribution to her tribe during these times? Were you in college at the time? What was your job? Did you help your tribe administer its programs and projects? What was happening to your family? Did you move to an urban area? What was it like? How did things change in your tribe and/or community? What were your successes and accomplishments? If you can answer any of these questions within the context of the times, you have a story. There is no shortage of topics. Each and every story is important to our tribal histories and our identity as Indian people and they all deserve to be preserved and recorded and published.


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3 Responses to Every Native American Woman has a Story to Tell

  1. Leif Fearn says:

    I worked in Dulce in the mid1960s when Charles Vigil was tribal chairman and Shon LaBrier was Head Start director. I learned recently that Jicarilla no longer includes the Colorado portion of the reservation that existed when I was there. What happened to Jicarilla in Colorado? Thank you for a moment of your time.

    Leif Fearn

  2. veronicatiller says:

    To my knowledge the Jicarilla Apache Reservation was never in Colorado. It was first created as Executive Order Res. in 1887 and added to in 1907 & 1908 but all the lands have been in NM. I do know that the Ute Mtn. Reservation in CO has a small piece of its reservation in NM and I think it borders the western side of the Jicarilla Reservation. Let me know more and maybe I can help. thanks for the comment and inquiry.

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